Geo-Music: The pop world’s response to the Pokémon Go phenomenon

It was only a matter of time before other industries picked up on the success of Pokémon Go. An augmented reality app was encouraging mobile phone users to go outside and explore the world, promoting the franchise in the process. It was perfect advertising for one thing, which tapped in to an emerging form of gaming. Now, it’s unsurprising that the world’s biggest pop stars are making use of this interactive concept.

Katy Perry is one of the artists who’s jumped on this craze when promoting her latest single, Chained to the Rhythm. Photo: Samantha Sekula

Whilst Pokémon Go can be described as an ‘augmented reality game’ (or ARG for short), what artists such as Katy Perry and Gorrilaz are doing isn’t really a game as such, and it doesn’t quite cover the definition of geocaching. Instead, this sees them hide their new song or album at specific locations around the world, ready for fans to find. Although Gorillaz are using a mobile app when it comes to giving listeners the chance to hear their new album in advance, Perry’s ‘game’ to promote Chained to the Rhythm doesn’t – leading me to use the term ‘geo-music’, unless there’s already a term used to describe this phenomena.

So, do I think it works? Can it deter the leaking of albums in the search for exclusivity? Maybe not, but for strong fanbases and passionate fans who are dedicated to hearing music from their favourite artists first, it’s certainly a way to motivate them. They’ll get talking to others in search for these surprises, word of mouth will occur and the excitement about an upcoming release will rise. It’s additional advertising prior to the actual song coming out, and it’s working. Fans get rewarded (in some cases, even with tickets in the case of Frances), and artists get the word out. It’s a win-win situation for both parties which could very much rise in popularity over the years.

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