#NewMusicFriday: ‘The Moment’ by Fickle Friends

Brighton band Fickle Friends release the second single from their upcoming EP, Broken Sleep – this time it’s the chilled, light bop, The Moment.

If Fickle Friends’ debut album You Are Someone Else was intended to be more of an introductory release setting out the group’s trademark sound, then their upcoming Broken Sleep EP looks set to be the experimental record which takes the band in exciting new directions.

Much like the previous release – the lead single and title track, Broken Sleep – The Moment has a vibe which certainly feels different to Shiner and co.’s back catalogue, yet has enough familiarity to it so as to not alienate their loyal fanbase.

It’s reminiscent of Midnight, albeit with a more experimental rhythm and tempo – one which runs away from the band in the song’s bridge. A steady beat quickly switches to a complex drum groove which fails to interlace with Natti’s typical soft vocals. Otherwise, the song still has a driving feel to it – galactic synths and a bouncy lyrical structure give this track the usual Fickle Friends bounciness which makes it a welcome addition to their experimental indie pop collection.

The Moment is the second single released from Fickle Friends’ upcoming EP, Broken Sleep, out later this year.

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REVIEW: ‘Beautiful People Will Ruin Your Life’ by The Wombats

The Wombats have certainly made some changes since their last album in 2015. Whilst the edgy album titles remain (this one being Beautiful People Will Ruin Your Life), the rock trio from Liverpool certainly succeeded in making an album which doesn’t “[punch] you in the face every time you listen to it” – pursuing a much more laid-back sound this time around.

Beautiful People Will Ruin Your Life sees The Wombat pursue a more laid-back sound, whilst maintaining the traditional and powerful kick from previous works. Photo: The Wombats.

Although, that is not to say that the band have completely ditched the rockier vibes heard on previous tracks like Moving to New York and Let’s Dance to Joy Division. They’re still present on the album – albeit in a slightly new and different (but interesting) way…

Take the opener, Cheetah Tongue, which slowly eases listeners into Beautiful People… with a gritty underlying guitar riff before dropping a loud, punchy drum beat. It’s stripped-back, yet still has that Wombats kick to it we’ve felt before.

That doesn’t stop with the following song, Lemon To A Knife Fight. As the lead single from the album, the group knew it had to offer a glimpse into what the ten-track record had in store. With anthemic vocals in the chorus on top of casual instrumentals, it perfectly balances the driving rock of the old with the chilled vibes of the new. It’s certainly the stand-out track from the album, so if you have to listen to one song from Beautiful People Will Ruin Your Life, make it this one.

Then follows the third and final single from the album, Turn – a track with retreating guitar and drums that make it a song focussing more on Matthew Murphy’s vocals than an all-round dance hit. It strikes that perfect balance between full-on rock and a slower, phones-in-the-air type track – an interesting in-between.

Yet, it’s not just the singles where we see such a balance between slower and faster vibes. Over the course of the next seven tracks, we either see the punch come from pulsing drums and guitar (Black FlamingoDip You in Honey and Lethal Combination), or from Murph’s loud lyrics (Out of My Head). Such a switch between the two keeps each track fresh as we progress towards the end of the album.

With that being said, the change-up in style is apparent when one considers the tempo of the tracks. Far from the pace of A Guide to Love, Loss and Desperation, their latest release, Beautiful People Will Ruin Your Life plays with a more relaxed rhythm – some tracks hiding the change with colourful beats and melodies, others placing emphasis on it to create a calmer feel.

This leads us to the final track, I Don’t Know Why I Like You but I Do – a track which, for the most part, is in clear contrast to the first three. A simplistic drum beat (with the odd bit of flair here and there) and smooth guitar melodies slow things down for Murph, before a gritty guitar interlude refreshes the feel and makes it a perfect showcase of the two sides of the album.

A refreshing change of style is always a risky, tough and lengthy process for any band to deliver, but with Beautiful People Will Ruin Your Life, The Wombats return to turn things down a notch, whilst maintaining the traditional groove fans know and love.

Rating: 4/5

#NewMusicFriday: ‘Cheetah Tongue’ by The Wombats

The Wombats are certainly painting an interesting picture as to what their upcoming album, Beautiful People Will Ruin Your Life. Their previous single Turn calmed things down a bit, but now the Liverpudlian trio have returned to vibes explored in Lemon to a Knife Fight with their new track, Cheetah Tongue.

Getting its first play on BBC Radio 1 on Wednesday this week, host Annie Mac referenced comments by lead singer Matthew Murphy (published on sites such as Dork and The Prelude Press) during an interview with the guitarist: “I wanted to make an album that had more swagger, was a bit more laid back, something that wasn’t punching you in the face every time you listen to it,” he had said. In a clear sign that the band have progressed since the days of A Guide to Love, Loss and Desperation and Glitterbug, the latest trio of singles have proven that The Wombats have been able to tone down their more pulsing rock, without that damaging their unique style.

After all, Cheetah Tongue (another bizarre but quirky song title) starts with tight, solid guitar strums underneath the opening verse, before an off-beat drum groove is introduced in the chorus – adding that traditional catchiness and kick to the single. Reading this, one might wonder what sets this era apart from previous releases. My answer? The Wombats have eased off backing vocals (seen on tracks like Kill the Director and Moving to New York) and slowed the tempo a little bit. The end result being a more stripped-back vibe, whilst still being brilliantly anthemic.

Musical Discovery: ‘Million Bucks’ by Smallpools

It’s always interesting listening to the music that artists themselves listen to, as they can often lead to some fascinating new finds. Look no further than Emma Blackery’s recent livestream, which saw viewers listen to a snippet of Million Bucks by Smallpools.

It’s a quintessential indie bop, released in the height of this year’s summer season and complete with seaside guitars and anthemic vocals singing about Los Angeles. Pack all this into a 4 minute song and you have a track on the same level as Chocolate by The 1975 and T-Shirt Weather by Circa Waves. In a sense, to group Million Bucks into such a genre does give the impression that it’s yet another upbeat indie song which lacks that particular unique edge, but that’s where the catchy chorus comes in, selling the track and sets it apart from all the others.

The lyrics and instrumentals have a strong part to play in its catchiness, but without a doubt, the pacing of the chorus keeps things flowing, fluttering and interesting to listen to. Take lines such as I’ve got all my, money on you/And though my, dollars are few, where a slight pause in the middle leaves enough room for punchy guitar chords and you have a solid chorus from the three-piece band. Then, when followed by an expressive instrumental interlude, the feel-good vibes are strong as the song comes to a close.

Musical Discovery: ‘Lifetimes’ by Oh Wonder

With the title track of Oh Wonder’s second album being a euphoric song with pounding drums and soothing harmonies, one would have assumed that Ultralife would have more of this heavy alternative sound, with quieter songs for balance. Follow-up singles such as Heavy and High on Humans also hinted at a similar path, yet the majority of the record sees Vander Gucht and West take on a softer tone. Despite this, there is one track with this particular style that stands out: Lifetimes.

At the heart of the track is the harmonies. Much like the male-female vocal contrast in Ultralife, we hear delicate high notes in Lifetimes – the repetitive line ‘doing it right’ adding to the distinctive chorus. It also adopts the slow build-up of the aforementioned single. Yet whilst there are structural similarities, there are some differences which show the duo are exploring new avenues in the wider album – take Anthony’s fast-paced, rhythmic vocals under a complex drum rhythm in the pre-chorus, for instance.

Whilst there’s no denying that Oh Wonder have a traditional sound which underlies every song (a sound which, one would argue, is somewhat similar to Of Monsters and Men), there’s a sense that Ultralife – the album, that is – is a ‘pick-and-mix’ record.

With Anthony and Josephine following the pattern of their last album and releasing Ultralife on a song-by-song basis, there’s a sense that listeners are invited to choose tracks which take their fancy. Whether it be electronic vibes apparent in SoloHeavy and High on Humans, or a more mellow sound heard in My Friends and Waste, there’s a fun element of choice for fans of this London-based duo.

Musical Discovery: ‘The Man’ by The Killers

Bass-heavy alternative is sweeping the genre at the moment, whether it’s full-on funk or something a little bit more inventive, everyone seems to be jumping on the musical bandwagon. Now, with a song that sounds like the lovechild of Jamiroquai and Two Door Cinema Club, Mr Brightside singers The Killers return from a five-year absence with The Man.

Although far from an anthemic rock single, the fluid drum beats and groovy guitars apparent in Battle Born and Hot Fuss still linger underneath Brandon Flower’s falsetto vocals. The Man (taken from the band’s upcoming album, Wonderful Wonderful) debuted as Annie Mac’s Hottest Record on BBC Radio 1, and certainly hints at a record which strikes a balance between funky alternative and hard-hitting rock.

However similar it may sound compared to other alternative bands in the industry at the moment, we can all be thankful that The Killers are back after a lengthy absence.

The Man is available to stream on Spotify and iTunes now.

Musical Discovery: ‘You’ by BLOXX

There’s always something exciting about finding a new band at the start of their musical journey. With nearly 3K followers on Twitter and only two singles under their belt, BLOXX (a four piece indie band from Uxbridge, West London) are still very much in their early stages, but have jumped in to the indie genre with gusto. You only need to look as far as their first track (Your Boyfriend) and their latest release, You – which came out last Friday – for proof.

A guitar melody which, upon first listen, sounded reminiscent of the Friends theme tune sets the upbeat, rocky tone for this track. Contrast Mozwin’s pounding drums with Ophelia Booth’s soft, mumbling vocals and you have a gritty indie anthem perfect for both live gigs and bedroom listening.

For the most part, it’s the ‘all too familiar’ guitar riffs and bass drums which are the true driving force of the song, but credit must also be given to Booth’s sound in the chorus. Now adopting a louder voice, it adds to the emotion created by the backing instruments to form the usual indie track we know and love.

As You builds on the success of Your Boyfriend, it looks as though we can expect to hear more of Bloxx on the radio in the future (the band have already had some coverage from the BBC), as well as some new material to boost the summer mood.