#NewMusicFriday: ‘First Aid’ by Eliza and the Bear

As Eliza and the Bear explore new sounds on their upcoming album, Group Therapy, their latest single First Aid is a little look back at the band’s beginnings – with lead singer James Kellegher taking centre-stage on this raw and impactful track.

After having revealed some of their personal struggles and their difficult journey to get to a second album, Eliza and the Bear think it “felt so right” that First Aid was released to fans this week – and they’re not wrong.

For one thing, it’s a break from the funk pop style we’ve seen on previous releases such as Higher, Hell and Real Friends. Instead, it feels like an emboldened version of what we already know from their debut. Out goes the loud drums and chanting vocals, replaced by a steady, controlled beat and soul from James. If Eliza and the Bear wanted to gently introduce their new sound, as opposed to a more daring and surprising approach, then this could very well have been a solid first single.

With the band already hinting that Group Therapy will be more funky release than their debut, First Aid moves away from that idea to deliver a passionate and raw track. Such a detour suggests that a bit of experimentation can be expected on their sophomore album, and for a band which has gone through some difficult times, they’re back, and the creativity is flowing.

First Aid is out now on Apple Music and Spotify. Eliza and the Bear’s second album, Group Therapy, is released on 5 October.

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‘Consent’ review – Nina Raine’s thought-provoking elaborate production raises many questions in a tense blend of love and justice

In a detailed exploration of love, justice and the law, Consent raises a lot of questions for the audience to ponder – both curious and confusing ones.

One would think that such confusion would come from the technicalities of the play being one of a legal nature, but Raine’s research shines confidently throughout in the writing. Instead, in a production which explores the many relationships of the characters on stage, what starts as a straightforward tale expands into something far more complex and puzzling.

From left: Adam James, Stephen Campbell Moore, Lee Ingleby, Clare Foster and Claudie Blakley. Credit: Johan Persson

Thankfully, this doesn’t stop Raine from raising some interesting points in the dialogue of her characters. The History Boys’ Stephen Campbell Moore and The A Word‘s Lee Ingleby are amongst the cast who deliver powerful performances and showcase excellent character development. The atmosphere’s tense, and the individuals three-dimensional – often expressing contrasting opinions throughout, which is particularly interesting to see.

Mix the topic of the play and the characters with a classical score and limited set design, and things start to feel a little more intense. Yet such a tone and pace for a play which explores many ideas does lead to some points being lost. It’s upon re-reading the play text that you begin to see some of the foreshadowing and wider, underlying discussions.

An impressive cast and excellent dialogue feature in Consent, but as the plot develops, some of the production’s underlying points get lost along the way.

Rating: 3.5/5

‘The Lieutenant of Inishmore’ review – Poldark’s Aidan Turner is hilarious in this bloody brilliant black comedy

Swapping the lovey-dovey vibes of Poldark for dark comedy, Aidan Turner’s latest performance is a surprising – but nonetheless refreshing – change from his role in the popular BBC period drama.

Set in the 90s during The Troubles, The Lieutenant of Inishmore at London’s Noël Coward Theatre sees Turner portray an Irish terrorist shocked by the news that his pet cat, Wee Thomas, is ‘unwell’ – to put it lightly.

From left: Chris Walley, Aidan Turner and Denis Conway. Photo: Johan Persson.

What follows is a play which is extreme in every meaning of the word – absurdist humour, blood and gore are being crammed into two intense, hilarious acts.

It’s a tone quickly established from the outset, with Chris Walley and Denis Conway delivering an incredible performance as duo Davey and Donny – one which almost rivals that of Turner.

A perfect balance between strong humour and shocking violence is struck throughout – something which is testament to Michael Grandage’s directing and ensures that the brave satire contained in Martin McDonagh’s (Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri) script is never once lost.

Gory, daft and extremely engaging, Aidan Turner leads a fantastic all-Irish cast in this thoroughly entertaining comedy.

Rating: 4/5

A Return to Public Speaking…

It’s been a while since I’ve flexed my public speaking muscles, as it were. Granted, I delivered a talk to members of the National Deaf Children’s Society’s Youth Advisory Board last month, but today saw me deliver a talk to a different audience at NDCS’ Right for the Future conference.

Liam delivering a talk about transitions at the Right for the Future conference in London. Photo: Rosie Eggleston.

With the audience being made up of mainly healthcare and educational professionals, the event brought people together to discuss and share ideas around deaf young people and their transitions through education. I was asked to help deliver a technology workshop, introduce the charity’s CEO (no pressure!) and sit on a panel, as well as give a short five-minute talk about my school experience.

I won’t explore my talk in too much detail, but I thought I’d explore some points raised further. In particular, it’s essential that information about a deaf young person is shared within schools as soon as possible when it comes to transitions, as nothing is worse than the young individual having to repeat their support needs when they start at a new school.

This is similar to support workers sharing documentation to make it easier for a deaf young person to apply for support in their next educational establishment. All of this should be done with enthusiasm and politeness, as any frustration with having to deal with a deaf person’s support requests will only diminish that person’s confidence.

On the topic of confidence, it’s important that both teachers and fellow classmates are deaf aware, as one is essential for the person’s education – the other for their social skills.

I’d encourage you all to have a read of the #RightForTheFuture hashtag on Twitter, which includes a lot of good points raised during the conference. Thanks to NDCS for inviting me down, I had a fantastic day.

Fandoms, we need to talk about copyright…

Disclaimer: I am not a legal expert. I have studied media law at university and have a basic understanding of copyright legislation.

It’s easy to lose yourself within a fan community. News and updates about our favourite stars are constant and soon circulate on social media sites such as Twitter and Tumblr. Fandom members are passionate, dedicated and excitable, and whilst such a mindset is understandable, it can sometimes lead to some oversight – particularly when it comes to copyright infringement.

Timothée Chalamet (centre, in red) on set for The King, coming to Netflix next year. It’s photos and videos I took of this shoot which were reposted online without my permission or credit. Photo: Liam O’Dell.

It was the start of a boiling hot week in Lincoln and news of filming on the grounds of the city’s cathedral had soon spread across the county. Local residents had gathered outside when news spread that one of the film’s producers, Brad Pitt, could possibly be in town.

Alas, he was not, but the lead actor in the new Netflix drama, Call Me By Your Name’s Timothée Chalamet, was. He plays the role of Henry V in The King, which is believed to come out next year.

News emerged that the historic cathedral would be used for Henry’s coronation, and this appeared to be the case when a blue carpet was rolled out, and Chalamet emerged nestled in a line of people marching towards the building. Keen to do some reporting, I got out my phone camera and started taking photos and video to share online. Things were going well, and the fact that I was seeing a film shoot unfold right in front of me was very exciting indeed.

Just moments after sharing a video of the shot being filmed on Twitter, tagging the actor, things took an interesting turn.

First of all, a fan account for the drama was quick to get in touch, asking if they could repost my image. I wasn’t so keen, preferring a retweet so that the content was on my account, rather than being reposted on somebody else’s – potentially without credit.

On this occasion, they did repost with credit – which was fine – and I soon settled for this as a compromise, knowing that even a credit on any reposted image could still help my social media following. Yet, as more people came across the photos and video, some weren’t providing the credit I asked for.

Granted, they probably weren’t aware of my request to provide credit until I notified them asking them to do so, but even this alludes to a larger problem within fan communities. This being the issue of copyright, and fans sharing any content displaying their favourite celebrity without real understanding of the consequences of doing so.

In fact, in around eight instances, I had to submit takedown requests to Instagram and YouTube (seven for the former, and one for the latter, I believe). In one case, an individual said my video was not copyrighted, which is not true.

Of course, under Section 11 of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, “the author of a work is the first owner of any copyright in it”. In terms of ‘broadcasts’ (this being the video I shared on Twitter), it’s “the person making the broadcast”.

Nevertheless, I have, for the most part, been lenient on fan accounts sharing my images and videos – I understand their excitement. In fact, it happened in January when fans of Downtown Abbey star Michelle Dockery reposted a photo of me meeting the star in London. However, all it takes is for one fan to share a copyrighted image online which the original owner doesn’t like (or feels infringes on their copyright) and then there’s a very difficult situation indeed.

Sure, in the case of, say, television shows, the networks may be okay with fans sharing promotional images, even though these photos are still copyrighted. This is probably on the grounds of free promotion (hundreds of fans sharing their promotional image is great for getting the word out), or the act of submitting hundreds of takedown requests is probably too laborious.

I remember the discussions we would have in school about how taking an image from Google Images is a big copyright faux pas. Are we now seeing said faux pas making its way into fan communities instead?

If so, then we need to build upon the cautiousness we already possess on social media when it comes to fake news, and introduce a greater sense of awareness around copyright within fan communities.

As someone who mingles in a couple of fandoms myself, these groups open up opportunities for creativity, collaboration and friendships. Such an experience should not be diminished by a careless approach to sharing images of our favourite stars online.