Confusing politics and why the ‘remain’ campaign has an advantage | The Friday Article

News and politics are boring – that is, until it can be related to people. It’s why Ebola only became a UK problem when nurse Pauline Cafferkey contracted the virus last year. In terms of politics, Nick Clegg’s apology for raising tuition fees prompted more young people to get involved with voting. As a result, the Liberal Democrats’ seats in parliament were slashed from 57 to 8. Now, with the EU Referendum approaching, people want to know how exactly the EU affects them – and that’s where Britain Stronger In Europe may have the upper hand.

Politics surrounding the UK and the EU has always been confusing - this is where the 'remain' campaign has the advantage. Photo: Michael Sauers on Flickr.
Politics surrounding the UK and the EU has always been confusing – this is where the ‘remain’ campaign has the advantage. Photo: Michael Sauers on Flickr. Licensed under Creative Commons – https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/legalcode.

With any election or referendum, vast amounts of political information is thrown at us in order to make an informed decision on who or what to vote for. In my case, it fuelled my interest in politics further ahead of last year’s general election. With the question of whether we should leave the European Union, we once again expect this barrage of detail. However, I get the impression that the UK’s business with the EU remains fairly secretive and hidden in the media. So, for a lot of us, we may have to learn about the numerous aspects of the European Union before we cast our vote. But, we would most likely turn to the ‘remain’ campaign for the positives before looking at Vote Leave’s scrutiny of these benefits.

This comes from something within our human nature: we like to criticise from time to time. On most occasions, we learn about a topic, see the positives and then criticise the idea with opposing views. It’s a technique which has helped comedians and of course, politicians.

If you don’t know much about the EU, turning to the leave campaign may not work. It’s hard for us to understand the criticism when we don’t know what it is that’s being criticised. As a result, many will turn to ‘remain’ for the facts first, before looking at ‘leave’ for the opposing views – some people will choose to adopt the views of ‘remain’, others may decide to back leaving the EU. Either way, the ‘remain’ campaign has that ‘first impression’ which puts them at a slight advantage.

The effect is purely psychological, but it may have unintended benefits for those campaigning for us to remain in a reformed European Union.

Are you interested in politics? Do you think this is a strategy that the ‘remain’ camp are using? Comment below!

Liam

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