The Additional Challenge of Shorthand

Next week, I’ll have an idea about whether or not I should take my NCTJ 80wpm shorthand exam at the end of April. It was whilst thinking about this decision, that I realised how beneficial learning the written language can be for a deaf person like me. Since then, I thought today I would talk about how shorthand could help the hard of hearing, or those with a mild/moderate hearing loss like myself.

Shorthand Pen and Notebook
With shorthand being as much of a listening skill as much as it is a writing skill, deaf people may find it challenging. Photo: Wannabe Hacks on Flickr. Licensed under Creative Commons – https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/legalcode.

For some deaf people and those with auditory processing disorder, it can take a while for us to ‘hear’ a word. In my case, when I am talking to someone with an accent, it’s often a matter of picking up the sounds, identifying them as words and then applying them to the context. But, when it comes to shorthand, the time pressure means you don’t have time to process what you hear – writing in shorthand is very much a thoughtless action.

When I think about it like this, I remember how learning to play the drums 10 years ago helped me and my co-ordination. Back then, it was terrible but I have since achieved Grade 8 and played at many concerts. If this was a motivational post, then you could say that I’ve overcome a challenge and proved that ‘anything is possible’.

But when it comes to shorthand, this time I’m testing this ability to process information quickly. Learning to play the drums improved my co-ordination, but it’s unlikely that learning shorthand will ‘cure’ my deafness or greatly improve my processing skills. First one thing, deafness cannot be ‘cured’ (at least not yet) and for another thing, this ability to ‘process’ what I am hearing is very much tied into my deafness, so that won’t change either. That being said, it’s certainly helped with my listening skills and thought processes.

At each level, the speed of the speaker reading a passage increases by 20 words per minute (I have to take my 60, 80 and 100 words per minute exams). This therefore means that I have less time to think before the next word is hurled at me out of nowhere. If I think too long on a certain word or mistake I’ve made, then I could then end up losing an entire sentence.

Thankfully, I passed my 60 words per minute shorthand exam earlier this year. At that speed, taking a message down should be instinctual – where all of the three steps I previously mentioned, plus converting the word into shorthand – should all take less than a second. Thankfully, at 60wpm, that is currently achievable. Now it’s a matter of increasing this to 80wpm.

On the whole, I suppose it comes down to not letting your disability stop you from doing what you want to do, but I promised that I wouldn’t get motivational…

What is your biggest challenge, and what have you learnt from it? Do you know shorthand? Comment below!

Liam

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